Stronger governance in 2018

Stronger governance leads to improved sustainability.

Governance of HRHF

Last year marked the end of HRHF’s five-year strategy 2014-2018, and was subsequently a year for evaluation – of the House concept and HRHF’s advocacy, and of planning our future work. We achieved significant progress towards our goals during this period, and have used our experiences to plan the next strategic period. The year was one of both looking back and planning ahead. 

In November 2018, external consultants assessed HRHF’s administrative capacities and competencies:

“HRHF has adequate administrative capacities and competence in place to undertake financial management… The HRHF organisational culture is one of mutual respect, transparency, accountability and ethical performance. There is a high awareness of financial risk, and the organisation has put important measures in place to prevent financial mismanagement and corruption.”

In January 2018, consultants finalised an external evaluation of the House concept and HRHF’s advocacy work.

The results of the January 2018 external evaluation were discussed at the meeting of Human Rights Houses in Tbilisi in February 2018. Some 60 representatives from Human Rights Houses reflected on the evaluation’s findings and gave valuable input to HRHF’s new five-year strategy.

Governance of Human Rights Houses

In 2018, we saw Houses become more visible and enjoy the benefits of increased collaboration among member organisations. More fundamentally, the Houses remained active and sustainable, despite some facing significant threats – from restrictions on foreign funding and on association, to hate speech and intimidation, to detentions and arrests.  

All of the Houses with shared offices were successful in fundraising for their running costs in 2018. HRHF financially supported the costs of 10 Human Rights Houses. Institutional support helps Houses to implement longer-term strategies as well as the short-term projects supported by many other donors.

Cooperation and collaboration among members are key to the success of Human Rights Houses. In 2018, nine Houses implemented strategies shared by two or more members and planned their activities in a longer-term perspective – determining the focus of their joint work and establishing projects within this.


Top photo: The results of the January 2018 external evaluation are discussed at the meeting of Human Rights Houses in Tbilisi in February 2018. Some 60 representatives from Human Rights Houses reflected on the evaluation’s findings and gave valuable input to HRHF’s new five-year strategy. Photo: HRHF.